C o m m e m o r a t i v e   C o i n s 
 
Ireland
The edge embossing on the Irish 2‐Euro‐commemorative coins is :
Image Country Date Feature Ref. Volume  
 
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Ireland 26 Mar. 2007 50th anniversary of the Signature of the Treaty of Rome 20001
20002
20005
4,650,112  
 

 

Description : The Treaty establishing the European Community, called the Treaty of Rome (originally called the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community and renamed the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union in December 2009) was signed on 25 March 1957 by Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands at the Conservatory Palace in Rome. It came into force on 1st of January 1958. At the same time two other treaties were concluded, the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, which established EURATOM, and the Agreement on Institutions Common to the European Communities, which stipulated that the European Economic Community (EEC), the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) and the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) had a common parliamentary assembly (now the European Parliament), a common Court of Justice and a common Economic and Social Committee. On the 5th of May 2006, EU Commissioner Joaquín Almunia and Eurogroup President Jean‐Claude Juncker announced the first transnational 2‐Euro commemorative coin to mark the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome. The directors of the Italian mint Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato, the Spanish mint Real Casa de la Moneda and the Austrian Mint Münze Österreich AG met in Vienna to exchange ideas. The ideas were presented and amalgamated into a design by the commissioned engraver Helmut Andexlinger, after approval he produced a model of the coin. It shows the treaty with the signatures of the representatives from the six founding states, framed by the pavement pattern of the Capitol Square in Rome, designed by Michelangelo where the treaty was signed.
National characteristics : At the top are the words "conradh na Róimhe" (Treaty of Rome) and "50 bliain" (50 years), below it is an illustration of the treaty with the words "an eoraip" (Europe), below that is the year "2007" and the country name "ÉIRE" (Ireland). The coin was minted without mint marks by the Irish mint Lárionad Airgeadra an Bhainc Ceannais / Central Bank Currency Centre in Áth an Ghainimh / Sandyford. Coins in the proof production process version were made by the Finnish mint Suomen Rahapaja OY in Vantaa.
 
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Ireland 01 Jan. 2009 10th anniversary of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) 20001
20002
20005
3,812,908  
 

 

Description : In 1972 the European Exchange Rate Mechanism was created to limit fluctuations between currencies. In 1975 a basket of currencies was used to define the European Currency Unit (ECU) and in 1979 the European Monetary System was created. 1990 saw the start of the first stage of European Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and in 1994 the second stage, during which the European Monetary Institute prepared for the establishment of the European Central Bank (ECB). In 1996 the European Commission established the currency abbreviation €. In 1999, saw the third stage of EMU, all participating currencies were linked to the euro by exchange rate parity. In 2008 a design competition was held for the EMU Community Edition coin and out of 5 proposals a winner, Georgios Stamatopoulos was determined by an online vote. The design shows a stylised human stick figure on the blank space of an irregularly shaped ancient coin, with the € symbol on the left arm. It symbolises the transition from the bartering of archaic times to European Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). Below the € symbol are the designer's initials "ΓΣ" and the years "1999‐2009".
National characteristics : Above is the name of the issuing country "ÉIRE" (Ireland), the acronym of the occasion of issue below is shown on the left with "AEA" (in Irish) and on the right of the years with "EMU" (in English). The coin was minted without mint marks by the Irish mint Lárionad Airgeadra an Bhainc Ceannais / Central Bank Currency Centre in Áth an Ghainimh / Sandyford, coins minted in the proof production process were made by the Royal Dutch mint Koninklijke Nederlandse Munt in Utrecht.
 
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Ireland 03 Jan. 2012 10th anniversary of the Euro‐Currency 20001
20002
20005
1,354,867  
 

 

Description : To mark the tenth anniversary of the final adoption of the euro as cash, all 17 EU countries using the euro as their official currency issued a commemorative € 2 coin. There were five designs submitted, which could be voted for online. The result was announed on the 30th of June 2011: the winning design was created by Helmut Andexlinger and shows a globe in the middle, overlaid with the euro symbol. The importance of the euro in Europe and the world as a whole coupled with the fact that it has become a global player in the international monetary system over the last ten years, is illustrated by the euro symbol. According to the designer, the symbolic elements around the stylised globe represent the suggestion that the euro offers more opportunities for businesses and markets which in turn ensures economic stability by encouraging investment in this environment. The factory shape symbolises production, the cargo ship trade, all of which benefit the symbolic family of four with three homes by providing more quality jobs and stable consumer prices. The symbol of the Eurotower in Frankfurt/M. represents financial strength and the two wind turbines shows stimulation in innovative investments that this environment presents, whose central element is the euro. At the bottom of the coin are the years "2002 and "2012".
National characteristics : At the top of the coin is the name of the issuing country "ÉIRE" (Ireland). The coin was minted without mint marks by the Irish mint Lárionad Airgeadra an Bhainc Ceannais / Central Bank Currency Centre in Áth an Ghainimh / Sandyford. Coins minted in the proof production process were made by the Royal Dutch mint Koninklijke Nederlandse Munt in Utrecht.
 
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Ireland 16 Oct. 2015 30th anniversary of the EU‐Flag 20001
20002
20005
1,000,000  
 

 

Description : From 1950, the Council of Europe had been working on the design of a flag for Europe. The proposal to adopt the emblem of the Paneuropa Union, founded by Richard Coudenhove‐Kalergi in 1922, was rejected because of its supposed Christian symbolism. In 1955 it was agreed that the European flag, also adopted by the European Community on 29th of June 1985, would be the European flag with the twelve (a number of twelve is considered a sign of perfection) golden stars in a circular (symbolising unity) arrangement on a blue background. To mark the 30th anniversary of the EU flag, all 19 EU countries which use the euro as their official currency issued a commemorative €2 coin. There were five designs to choose from which could be voted for online. The result was declared on 28th of May 2015. The coin design was created by Georgios Stamatopoulos, coin designer at the Bank of Greece, whose initials "ΓΣ" can be seen in the lower right‐hand corner. It shows twelve stylised persons in a circle around a European flag with the twelve euro stars.
National characteristics : Above is the name of the issuing country "ÉIRE" (Ireland), followed by the dates "1985‐2015". The coin was minted without mint marks by the Irish mint Lárionad Airgeadra an Bhainc Ceannais / Central Bank Currency Centre in Áth an Ghainimh / Sandyford. Coins minted in the proof manufacturing process were made by the Austrian mint Münze Österreich AG in Vienna.
 
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Ireland 20 Jan. 2016 100th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland 20001
20002
20005
4,500,000  
 

 

Description : The Easter Rising of 1916 (Irish: Éirí Amach na Cásca) was an attempt by militant Irish republicans to force Ireland's independence from the United Kingdom. Although militarily unsuccessful, it is considered a turning point in Ireland's history, which ‐ after the War of Independence 1919‐1921 ‐ ultimately led to independence. The first national Irish 2‐euro commemorative coin, designed by Emmet Mullins shows the portico of Dublin's main post office, completed in 1818, with the statue of Hibernia, an Irish symbol, above it sculpted by John Smyth (∼1773‐1840). The capture of the Post Office in 1916 triggered the Easter Rising. The name of the statue is derived from the ancient Greek name for the island, is considered a witness to the events of 1916 as well as a symbol of the country's development based on the ideals of Patrick Pearse's Proclamation for the next hundred years. Its gaze is directed towards the future; it is also a symbol of the country's past, present and future. At the top of the coin is the word "HIBERNIA", in majuscules script similar to that in the historic Book of Kells. The sun's rays symbolise the Revolt and the Proclamation, which mark the beginning of the development of a new nation and republic. Either side of the statue are the years "1916" and "2016", at the bottom of the coin is the name of the issuing country "ÉIRE" (Ireland) and below it the year of issue "2016". The coin was minted without mint marks by the Irish mint Lárionad Airgeadra an Bhainc Ceannais / Central Bank Currency Centre in Áth an Ghainimh / Sandyford. Coins minted in the proof production process were made by the Austrian mint Münze Österreich AG in Vienna.
 
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Ireland 21 Jan. 2019 Centenary of the first sitting of Dáil Éireann (House of Assembly) 20001
20002
20005
1,000,000  
 

 

Description : The commemorative coin celebrates the first sitting of the "Assembly of Ireland", the Dáil Éireann (House of Assembly), on the 21st of January 1919, at which Ireland's independence was proclaimed, invoking the Easter Proclamation of 1916, triggering the two‐year Irish War of Independence. The unicameral Parliament met in the Round Room of Mansion House, the residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin, built in 1710. Since 1922, Leinster House, the former Dublin ducal palace, has been the seat of Dáil Éireann, the House of Representatives. The inspiration for the coin motif stylised by Emmet Mullins is a photograph taken in August 1921 showing the "Round Room" filled with members of parliament and others, surrounded by an audience in the gallery. The heads of those present in the round and in the gallery are symbolised by dots. At the top of the coin is "1919" and across the middle "An Chéad Dáil" (the first assembly) in traditional uncial (majuscule) script, below which is the country name "ÉIRE" (Ireland) and the year of issue "2019". The coin was minted without mint marks by the Irish mint Lárionad Airgeadra an Bhainc Ceannais / Central Bank Currency Centre in Áth an Ghainimh / Sandyford. Coins minted in the proof production process were made by the Bavarian mint Bayerisches Hauptmünzamt in Munich.
Ireland 01 Jul. 2022 35th anniversary of the Erasmus Program 20003 500,000  
 

 

Description :  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
References :
20001 Images taken with authorisation by the ECB ‐ Mail dated 20.Feb.2020
© "European Central Bank"
20002 Data mirrored from Wikipedia Page "2_euro_commemorative_coins"
with friendly support of the guardians of that page.
20003 Not Applicable   20004 Coloured version of this Commemorative Coin in circulation
EU‐legal‐technical specifications do not recongnise colour prints. The EU nevertheless tolerates them, as their numbers are very small and they are sold in special packs and therefor are very unlikely to be used as currency.
20005 enlarged Images taken with authorisation by Gerd Seyffert
© "Gerd Seyffert 2021"
20006 Not Applicable  
20007 Images taken by Münzen Kreuzberg
© "Münzen Kreuzberg 2021"
20008 enlarged Images taken by Münzen Kreuzberg
© "Münzen Kreuzberg 2021"